Arthritis-Symptom.com
Information about all types of arthritis and inflammatory conditions.

Check out our Arthritis News Site   Click here
For the most up to date arthritis news

 

 

 

 

About Us

Complete List of our Hundreds of Arthritis Topics

Health News
64 condition specific health  news pages

 
 

Webmaster 

 

Golfer’s elbow

Golfer’s elbow similar to tennis elbow. The pain focus is the knobby bump on the inside of the elbow closest to the body (the medial side), so it is technically known as medial epicondylitis.

The muscles of the forearm that control the wrist and hand begin just above the elbow joint. These muscles can become inflamed and may even partially tear if subjected to excess or repetitive stress. Pain from this inflammation may arise and progress suddenly or gradually.
 
 

Causes of golfer's elbow

Overuse of the muscles and tendons of the forearm and elbow are the most common reason people develop golfer's elbow. Repeating some types of activities over and over again can put too much strain on the elbow tendons. These activities are not necessarily high-level sports competition. Shoveling, gardening, and hammering nails can all cause the pain of golfer's elbow. Swimmers who try to pick up speed by powering their arm through the water can also strain the flexor tendon at the elbow.

In some cases, the symptoms of golfer's elbow are due to inflammation. In an acute injury, the body undergoes an inflammatory response. Special inflammatory cells make their way to the injured tissues to help them heal. Conditions that involve inflammation are indicated by "-itis" on the end of the word. For example, inflammation in a tendon is called tendonitis. Inflammation around the medial epicondyle is called medial epicondylitis.

Symptoms of golfer's shoulder

  • Pain or tenderness on the inner side of the elbow
  • Pain increases when:
    • Shaking hands
    • Turning doorknobs
    • Picking up objects with your palm down
    • Hitting a forehand in tennis
    • Swinging a golf club
    • Applying pressure to this area
  • Possibly pain extending down the forearm
  • Tightness of forearm muscles
  • Stiffness or trouble moving the elbow or hand

Treatment of golfer's shoulder

  • Rest helps, with avoidance of the activities which over use the elbow.
  • Physiotherapy treatments, which may include heat / ultrasound therapy.
  • Use of anti inflammatory drugs and ordinary pain killers (analgesics).
  • Your doctor may suggest an injection of a small dose of steroid to the affected area. This is not the sort of steroid banned for athletes. If used it can last for up to three months, and although it may need to be repeated you seldom need more than two or possibly three injections.
 
This web site is intended for your own informational purposes only. No person or entity associated with this web site purports to be engaging in the practice of medicine through this medium. The information you receive is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a physician or other health care professional. If you have an illness or medical problem, contact your health care provider.