Arthritis-Symptom.com
From the Consumer Health Information Network
 

Custom Search
 

 

About Us

 
 

Have a question about any type of arthritis let our community help you find the answer

Arthritis Answers

Health News
64 condition specific health  news pages

Webmaster 

 

Symptoms

Causes

Treatment

Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is a Greek word meaning "without cartilage formation" and is one of the most common causes of dwarfism. The appearance is of short stature with disproportionately short arms and legs and a large head. The characteristic facial features include a prominent forehead and a flattened bridge of the nose.

Although this condition can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, 80% of cases are due to new, sporadic mutations. Mutations involve the gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), situated on chromosome 4. Most commonly, a point mutation causes the substitution of arginine for glycine (G380R) in the transmembrane region of the receptor.

There is growing evidence that mutations of FGF3R confer a "gain of function". It is proposed that the normal function of FGFR3 is to slow down the formation of bone by inhibiting the proliferation of chondrocytes, the cells that produce cartilage. The mutation increases the activity of FGFR3, severely limiting bone growth.
 



This theory is supported by the knock-out mouse model in which the receptor is absent, and so the negative regulation of bone formation is lost. The result is a mouse with excessively long bones and elongated vertebrae, resulting in a long tail. Achondroplastic mouse models are useful tools in developing potential treatments

The information in this article is compiled from the National Institute of Health.

Modified 1-20-06
achondroplasia-picture

Skeletal Dysplasia Picture

 
 
 
 
 
   

This web site is intended for your own informational purposes only. No person or entity associated with this web site purports to be engaging in the practice of medicine through this medium. The information you receive is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a physician or other health care professional. If you have an illness or medical problem, contact your health care provider.

05/27/2011

Link to Arthritis-Symptom.com
And help arthritis suffers find the
information they need