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Gout Diet

Gout Diet

Diet is one of the most important ways of preventing gout attacks.

  • Alcohol, especially beer, should be avoided. Limit alcohol consumption to 1 drink 3 times a week.
  • Drink 2 to 3 L of fluid daily. Adequate fluid intake helps dilute urinary uric acid.
  • Avoid High-Purina foods
  • Consume a moderate amount of protein. Limit meat, fish and poultry to 4 - 6 oz per day. Try other good protein food such as low fat dairy products, tofu and eggs.
  • Limit fat intake by choosing leaner meats, foods prepared with less oils and lower fat dairy products.

 
 

Avoiding high purines foods on a gout diet

Uric acid is a metabolic product of purine nucleic acids. Some purines are made in the body, while other purine comes from the food we eat. Reducing the amount of purines eaten would seem sensible, though evidence to demonstrate that would seem to be lacking. Weight reduction in those who are overweight is probably at least, if not more, important.

Gout diet and weight

Uric acid is a metabolic product of purine nucleic acids. Some purines are made in the body, while other purine comes from the food we eat. Reducing the amount of purines eaten would seem sensible, though evidence to demonstrate that would seem to be lacking. Weight reduction in those who are overweight is probably at least, if not more, important.

Avoid High-Purine foods

Avoiding high purine foods on a gout diet

Uric acid is a metabolic product of purine nucleic acids. Some purines are made in the body, while other purine comes from the food we eat. Reducing the amount of purines eaten would seem sensible, though evidence to demonstrate that would seem to be lacking. Weight reduction in those who are overweight is probably at least, if not more, important.

 

Foods High in Purine.
It is best to avoid these foods

Foods with Moderate levels of purines eat occasionally

Liver Asparagus
Kidney Beef
Anchovies Bouillon
Sardines Chicken
Herrings Crab
Mussels Duck
Bacon Ham
Scallops Kidney beans
Cod Lentils
Trout Lima beans
Haddock Mushrooms
Veal Lobster
Venison Oysters
Turkey Pork
Alcohol esp. beer Shrimp
  Spinach

Foods that can help prevent a gout attack

Cherries and Cherry Juice: Normally your body creates enzymes that remove purines from your body before they are converted into uric acid. A person with gout does not have enough of these enzymes in their bodies. Cherries have enzymes that are very similar to the ones our bodies should be making. There is a growing amount of medical research that shows that eating cherries or drinking cherry juice can lower the uric acid level in your body.

Fruits: Eating fruit high in vitamin C can be helpful. Grapefruit, oranges, pineapple, strawberries and of course cherries are the best. Real sweet fruits such as grapes are not advised because high concentrations of sugar can raise your uric acid level. Star fruit is to be avoided because it can make gout worse.

Celery: Celery and especially celery seeds have long been used to treat gout. Celery seeds are known to be a natural diuretic and are believed to help remove uric acid from the body. Many people use celery seeds and celery seed extract as their only treatment for their gout.

Coffee: Believe it our not drinking coffee can lower your risk of a gout attack. A study published in June 2007 issue of the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism followed 46,000 male medical professionals for over 12. The study found that those who drank at least 4 cups of coffee a day had a 40% less risk of gout and those who drank at least 6 cups had a 60% lower risk.

 

 

Gout description and picture

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